Package Details: couchpotato 3.0.1-4

Git Clone URL: https://aur.archlinux.org/couchpotato.git (read-only)
Package Base: couchpotato
Description: Automatic Movie Downloading via NZBs & Torrent
Upstream URL: http://couchpota.to/
Licenses: GPL3
Submitter: Glanzick
Maintainer: justin8
Last Packager: justin8
Votes: 38
Popularity: 0.000001
First Submitted: 2013-12-07 19:31
Last Updated: 2016-08-22 10:26

Latest Comments

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TimoVerbrugghe commented on 2016-11-07 22:02

Anyone trying to use this in a reverse proxy with Apache? I just can't seem to get this to work, nzbget/sonarr/deluge/etc... are all working perfectly with the reverse proxy setup.

Urlbase web/couchpotato is set in config.ini

Have a virtual host with this setup

# General Proxy Settings #
ProxyPreserveHost Off
ProxyRequests Off
<Proxy *>
AddDefaultCharset off
Order allow,deny
Allow from all
</Proxy>

ProxyPass /web/couchpotato/ http://localhost:8082/web/couchpotato
ProxyPassReverse /web/couchpotato/ http://localhost:8082/web/couchpotato

justin8 commented on 2016-08-22 10:28

Thanks, fixed now.

@Smith_oo4 you're correct. Either for this or the -git one you would want to disable the auto-update so it can't update outside of the package manager.

snoopy commented on 2016-08-19 22:00

FYI looks like a minor typo in the .install file

Need to change /avar/lib/couchpotato to /var/lib/couchpotato

Smith_oo4 commented on 2016-08-05 14:47

I am by no means an expert on the topic but I do have a question about the ownership of /usr/lib/ couchpotato. This is the directory where the application itself is stored. Not to be confused with /var/lib/ couchpotato where user data is stored; i.e. configuration and metadata.

After a clean install I found /usr/lib/couchpotato to be owned by couchpotato. This works however I was expecting it to be owned by root. Root ownership would be for security; that way the application can’t alter itself. This is my understanding of how the sonarr package in the AUR work. Is there some reason why /usr/lib/couchpotato is owned by couchpotato? Or am I completely out to lunch on my understanding of this topic?

I could see having /usr/lib/couchpotato own by couchpotato so the application could update itself. However if you wanted the application to be self-updating would you not want to uses the couchpotato-git package in the AUR. This package would be for when you want the use the package manager for doing the updating. Is my understanding on this correct or once again am I completely out to lunch?

Smith_oo4 commented on 2016-08-05 14:25

I just did a clean install of the OS and couchpotato and found that /var/lib/couchpotato (where couchpotato stores user data) was owned by root. This was preventing the application from running and only after I changed ownership could I get the web page; i.e.:

$ sudo chown -R couchpotato:couchpotato /var/lib/couchpotato

Is this the expected action or am I doing something wrong?

justin8 commented on 2016-06-22 10:25

All good :)

plonqor commented on 2016-06-22 09:52

Yeah my bad, slightly misunderstood your post.

justin8 commented on 2016-06-22 06:23

Yep, that's what I said before. But when you install the package next, /var/lib/couchpotato will be owned by couchpotato instead of whatever use you put in. The tmpfiles thing I posted in that same post fixes that by changing permissions whenever the system starts or you issue `systemd-tmpfiles --create` manually

plonqor commented on 2016-06-22 05:18

@justin8 Well I now realise why you didn't want to manager group permissions... more of a pain than I thought.

But I found a much easier way to do your method. Simply run:

sudo systemctl edit couchpotato

And put in:

[Service]
User=username

Save the file, restart the service, and done! Updates will not replace the override.
Source: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Systemd#Editing_provided_units

justin8 commented on 2016-06-15 07:15

If the group permissions are working for you then that should be fine. I didn't want to manage group membership and instead opted for the tmpfiles to reset the owner. I haven't had to manually touch anything on it in almost 2 years now since I set that up.